The sommelier’s roaster

Daniela Capuano’s coffee story began as early as she can remember growing up on the family-owned coffee farm in Tres Pontas, the Minas Gerais region of Brazil. “It is a reality that I am used to,” she reminisces. “It’s very holistic, I have more idea about what happens to the beans before they get here – and I know Brazilian coffees very well.”

image
Following her studies in art and graphic design, the 33 year-old was always drawn back to the bean during her work and travels in Brazil, Ireland and France. She got her big break in specialty coffee when she stumbled across an opportunity to hone her barista and roasting skills at a Brazilian coffee shop in Belo Horizonte: “When I was working there, I participated in the first barista competition, then I went onto the national competition and met other baristas”. It was also at this time that Daniela first started to experiment roasting coffee on a 1kg Probatino. “It was fun. We had no software, just pencil and paper”, she adds.

 

image
After a year promoting coffee for the Brazilian Specialty Coffee Association (BSCA) across Europe, Daniela finally put her roots down in Paris. Since 2013, she has been at the helm of the roasting and production operation at L’abre a Café – an inviting boutique roastery and coffee shop tucked away in the Sentier district of the city centre. The coffee shop and roastery is also the brain-child of Hippolyte who is the founder and co-creator of L’Arbre à Café. The head of quality control and green buying is passionately committed to bringing biodynamic coffees to the table of his clients and customers in Paris and across Europe.

 

In characteristic Parisian style, L’Arbre à Café caters for a range of discerning clients who expect the highest standards in gastronomy. Roasting single origins in small batches on a 12kg Probat, Daniela’s meticulous focus on quality and traceability means that L’Arbre à Café is regarded as one of the pre-eminent coffee roasters that chefs and sommeliers across the city turn to first for their coffee of choice.

 

image
“Most of them are looking for a good quality product with flavour. They want to know where it comes from – produit du terroir – and normally look for something sweet and round for espresso with low acidity”, she says. The exacting requirements of her end-customers means that Daniela goes the extra mile to establish relationships with producers and source their coffees directly. The mainstay of their year-round offering comprises of three coffees from Fazenda Camocim in Espirito Santo in Brazil, the Yirgacheffe region in Ethiopia and a biodynamic farm in Tamil Nadu, India.

 

“I like to know where the coffee comes from and goes”, insists Daniela, “we want to build long-term relationships with the producers that we source directly from. Then we have special editions, that’s when we can work with nice producers that we can’t afford to work with all year round. We try to source biodynamic coffee, but it’s not always possible”.

 

image
Depending on seasonality, L’Arbre à Café also sources directly from producers in Peru and Reunion Island – the home of the famed Bourbon Pointu varietal. But Daniela maintains that it is the perennial quest for quality that guides her ethical sourcing policy in the roastery, before adding with knowing smile: “I know the quality of the coffee from Espirito Santo. It tastes like my childhood; apples and pineapples. Usually, it can be a bit too tropical for the average French customer. That’s why we don’t have many clients who want us to roast for filter, but the ones that do – they love it”.

 

FOLLOW SPRING ROASTERS AT:

 

This article was commissioned by algrano for the blog series Demystifying the Coffee Value Chain

Spring roasters grow new shoots in Basel

The quest to serve high quality coffee is an all year-round endeavor at the ever-popular Café Frühling – meaning Spring Café. After four years’ catering for Basel’s growing thirst for specialty coffee, the Hohlmann brothers have expanded their Swiss-based coffee enterprise with a 12kg Diedrich.
Felix, who heads up the roasting operation is excited about the new addition to the family: “The Diedrich is totally different to the roasters I have used before. It has a different drum where the inflow of air is pre-heated. It stays between the drum and the bowl so if you give more airflow, you also give more energy”.

image
Demonstrating a tireless passion for his ongoing education in coffee, he quit his studies to join his elder brother Benjamin; one-time Swiss Brewers Champion (2014) and current German Cup Tasters Champion. The rising star in the specialty coffee scene founded and now runs the well-respected coffee training academy, Kaffeemacher.

 

Felix is also well known on the competition circuit in his own right and came second in the Swiss Barista Championship last year. He explains: “My plan was to come here for one year but I stayed for longer – now it’s been seven years already. In that time, I started to help my brother who was working in gastronomy. Then I began university but quit my business studies after a year because I was already to much affected be the virus called coffee passion. I focused more and more on coffee and planned how to continue my own education in the coffee world by doing courses and competitions. That’s how I learnt most about coffee. At the same time, we started Kaffeemacher, the coffee academy where I was assisting the trainers”.

 

image
The 26 year-old maintains that the academy, which runs the SCAE Diploma, remains neutral in the market where its students have access to a large range of different espresso machines, grinders and roasters to experiment on. The academy allows the brothers to focus on raising skills and knowledge in the coffee industry whilst Café Frühling offers the perfect platform for them to showcase their passion in specialty coffee to Basel’s coffee-loving public.

 

image
The arrival of their Diedrich enables them to do just this, he says: “Café Frühling is our coffee shop but the beginning of this year we have started a new roasting business which is called Spring Roasters. Our main focus is the coffee shop and home users. If there are other coffee shops and restaurants that want to know more about where the coffee comes from, they are welcome to work with us.
The defining moment that opened Felix’s eyes to the importance of a coffee’s origin and provenance was a trip to Nicaragua in 2012: “It was game-changing for me because you realise how many hands the beans go through until they arrive to Europe. When I came back in the coffee shop, I realised how much work is behind it when I push the button”.

 

image
In the spirit of collaboration, Café Frühling, continue to source their coffee through a ‘coffee pool’ with other roasters in Switzerland and Germany. One standout coffee was a pulped natural processed coffee from Sítio Forno Grante, Espirito Santo, Brazil, sourced directly though algrano. “It is much fruitier”, he adds, “it’s totally different to a normal Brazilian coffee. I would have loved to play a bit more with a filter roast profile as we roasted it for espresso last year. It was really like a cup profile where everybody can find something in there – no matter what the person’s experience”.

 

image
With Felix at the helm of the roasting operation and brother Benjamin keeping a close eye on quality control, the Hohlmann brother’s are looking forward to bringing a new season of Espirito Santo’s crop to the tulip-adorned tables of Café Frühling this year. And just as their Diedrich is sign of promising new shoots for Spring Roasters, their seasonal coffee menu for espresso and filter will continue to ensure that exciting new specialty coffees will continue to spring-eternal in Basel.

 

FOLLOW SPRING ROASTERS AT:

 

This article was commissioned by algrano for the blog series Demystifying the Coffee Value Chain

A passion for coffee past and present

Stefan Bracht’s coffee obsession took root as his expanding collection of coffee-making paraphernalia grew. His assembly of antiquated hand roasters, brewing equipment and grinders soon became a focal point for the growing community of coffee lovers in Berlin. Frequently, they would meet in the basement of his architectural practice to talk, brew and taste coffee.
image
His first coffee shop, Kiez Coffee Bar, was already one of the early pioneers in the city’s burgeoning specialty coffee scene. But Stefan still needed a home for his historic array of coffee equipment that he had amassed over time. In a joint-venture with Karlheinz Rieser, of Coffee Star, the duo decided to combine both of their eclectic collections for the coffee-loving public: “I was already using the basement for a long time to meet people in the coffee scene and decided to fund the opening of a museum with Karlheinz Rieser,” he says, “we started in 2006 with the aim of educating people through information and our collections about coffee history”.
A year later Stefan began to roast his own coffee following a number of trips with his wife, Tahereh, to coffee producing regions in Kenya, Ethiopia, Brazil, Ecuador, and Puerto Rico. Their passion for travelling to origin countries to establish long-term relationships with coffee producers has born fruit and directly-traded coffee now accounts for more than a third of Kiez Rösterei’s importing and roasting operation.
image
“For us, the main point of selecting green coffee is both quality and origin. At the moment we have twenty-five different coffees and two blends using robusta. Our coffees come mainly from Latin America; that’s where our preferred single origins come from. We want a direct contact with producer and other people involved in the coffee”, adds Stefan.
Kiez Rösterei currently roasts approximately 10 tons a year on their Giesen W15 and small batch W1 which supplies their own neighbourhood coffee shop as well as a broad mix of local and international customers in Berlin, London and New York. Stefan says that they also supply a number of resellers across Germany, Austria and Holland. This international portfolio of customers keeps Stefan and his team of five extremely busy with the addition of a trainee to help him keep up with demand in the roaster.
“Specialty coffee production in small roasteries is coming more and more to the market, especially as people are more interested in food in general. There is a growing interest but it’s still a hard way to go”, insists Stefan. He says that the challenge of importing directly takes a lot of time and effort but the rewards are often recognized by his customers before going on to add, “people are willing to pay a higher price for the coffee if they can follow the coffee from the producer. It’s very important for us to know the people behind specialty coffee and the kind of quality we can expect”.
Stefan is already planning his next trip to visit producers in Honduras next month and continues to source a large volume of his Brazilian coffee through algrano. The natural process Sitio Fortaleza do Gilson has sold well in his coffee shop as a single origin and as the base component of their popular Roasters&Baristi blend. The 56 year-old says he particularly enjoys the connection with producers through the platform – especially as he finds sourcing specialty coffee from Brazil a perennial challenge.
image
For Kiez Rösterei and its customers, algrano represents a reliable route to closer co-operation and communication with coffee growers. Now that the new year is in full swing with many exciting new arrivals ahead, Stefan is setting his sights on expansion to the Middle Eastern market; a move that will no doubt grow the business and his growing collection of coffee-related devices – both from the past and to the present.
FOLLOW KIEZ RÖSTEREI AT:

This article was commissioned by algrano for the blog series Demystifying the Coffee Value Chain

Where two worlds meet

It was a long but revelatory wait for a bus that nudged Lukas Zugar into first discovering specialty coffee during a spell of travelling across China. The 30 year-old founder of Dos Mundos – meaning ‘two worlds’ – decided to kill some time by heading into a local coffee shop offering a range of single origins on the brew bar. “They had many ways of preparing coffee from different origins”, he remembers, “it was the first time that I realised how coffee could be so delicious on its own. Coming back to the Czech Republic, I looked for the same experience”.

 

Lukas’ interest in coffee was fired up even further when he bought a Behmore sample roaster to experiment with when he returned back to Prague. His thirst for trying out different roasting styles and coffees soon meant that his front living room was quickly filling up with coffee sacks. Wondering how he was going to find enough space to accommodate his growing stocks of green coffee, Lukas decided that he should start roasting professionally – beginning with the purchase of a Giesen W6 just three years-ago.

 

“We have so many ways to play with the coffee. Our Giesen is a great machine and I can play with the drum speed and airflow. Sometimes the ‘sweet spot’ is very small. Even when I’m roasting a coffee for six months, I’m still trying to improve the coffee. It usually takes four to five batches to reveal its character. For some coffees, I can do it in one to two batches. Ethiopian coffees are especially challenging, because they are multi-varietal”.

 

Noting that his favourite coffee is Kenyan for it’s high sweetness and cleanness, Lukas particularly favours washed-process coffees that offers up good acidity. “It’s very difficult to buy very good natural-processed coffees”, he adds, “it’s demanding on the sorting of the beans which makes it quite challenging. There are so many ways of post-harvest processing, sometimes it’s unclear what the producer does with the coffee. Even with washed coffees, Kenyans are doing it differently than in Ecuador or Nicaragua”.

 

But despite the roasting challenges presented by different processing methods, overall cup quality guides the sourcing and buying decisions at Dos Mundos. This is demonstrated by virtue of the fact that their current lowest scoring coffee in the roaster – Burundi Kibuye – based on SCAA protocol is 87 points: “For us, it’s mainly about quality; we want the best coffee possible with nice sweetness and balance. When we receive samples of the green coffee, if it’s better than good, we then take a second round with a V60”, he says.

 

For Lukas, his wife Adela and their team of four baristas, offering consistently good service and upholding the highest standards of quality has earned Dos Mundos a stellar reputation in the flourishing Czech coffee culture community. The playful visual language of their coffee shop – or ‘kavárna’ in Czech – suggests a sense of the two worlds of the producer and customer coming together into a welcoming setting that celebrates the seasonality of the specialty product that is being served up.

 

“We try to share the story of the farmers”, says Lukas when addressing questions around the sustainability of coffee in the future, “it’s important to give all the information to the consumer. For the majority of coffee producers, the price is not sustainable for them. Even getting seven or eight euros a kilo is on the edge. In many producing countries inflation is also rising and we need to convince the final consumer to pay more for quality coffee”.

 

This effort to ensure that their coffees are sustainably traded and as traceable as possible is also in response to the growing interest in direct trade amongst Czech coffee drinkers. As awareness and demand amongst consumers increases with each year, roasteries such as Dos Mundos are now turning to alternative approaches to sourcing their coffee.

 

And for Lukas, algrano helps to bring these two worlds closer together: “Algrano is a great platform for a third-wave roaster like us. We are sourcing top quality, traceable coffees from around the world and with algrano we are also able to get in touch with farmers. The ability to share with our customers the stories of farmers and their coffee is key for us and we believe it is also a way how to help good farmers to receive more money and credit for what they do. We are looking forward to sharing their story and I am sure that our customers are going to love this new approach”.

 

FOLLOW DOS MUNDOS AT:

 

This article was commissioned by algrano for the blog series Demystifying the Coffee Value Chain

Quality and transparency is the new black

Neues Schwarz is a striking-looking coffee shop where a harmonious balance of form and function meet. Nestled in the town of Dortmund-Mitte, in the eastern Ruhr region of Germany, the coffee shop’s understated central espresso and brew bar helps to put the spotlight on the real star of the show. A Probat P12 roaster also takes pride of place to one side of the coffee shop which complements the practical two tone surroundings. The open-plan interior communicates a strong ethos at the heart of the coffee enterprise. From the meticulous design aesthetic to the roasting operation and regular cupping sessions – the enjoyment and appreciation of specialty coffee is clearly designed to take centre stage.

 

image
Founder of Neues Schwarz, Benedikt Heitmann, says that his background in urban planning helped him to start his coffee business in 2014. “You look at the complete system and you try to optimize things – which means that you go to parts of the city where there is a lot of empty space. You try to connect to the landlords, understand the dynamic, and try to push to use the space for galleries or social projects”, he muses.

 

image
A keen eye for good design combined with two-and-a-half years of experience learning his craft as a roaster at Nuremburg-based Machhörndl Kaffee exudes from every detail at Neues Schwarz; meaning New Black. The carefully thought-through space and select single origins on offer is testament to Benedikt’s obsession with quality: “I really like the fact that with green coffee, you have normally less or no idea how it is going to taste. Once you have roasted it, you reveal all the complexity and the flavour that people are looking for”, he says. “As some of our customers normally drink coffee that is darkly roasted, it’s a lot of work for us to educate them. We roast light but not too light. They often think it’s flavoured with syrups – they’re surprised that coffee can be so complex and there are so many flavours you can taste. We have a lot of people going out of the shop asking themselves; ‘what was that?’ Once they get it, they turn into a regular customer”.

 

image
The 33 year-old is proud of his expanding team of seven coffee professionals. He sees their role as pioneers who are helping their customers to understand the wider story behind coffee – particularly at origin where he takes a principled stand towards greater transparency. “We try to trade coffee as directly as possible”, he comments, “but we are not yet in the position to do it completely direct, our team is too small and we don’t have the capacity to travel a lot. We are still looking for producers which we can establish a long-term relationship with. There are a couple of coffee producers where we bought from two years in a row now and that’s the way we want to go”.

 

image
Benedikt’s appreciation of the work of the coffee grower is coupled with concern when he thinks about the impact of climate change is having at origin. “Most traders and scientists say that global warming brings less production of arabica coffee. Specialty coffee is climbing up the hills, but there is a point where it can’t climb any higher. Roya is still a big concern in central America – we will have to see what happens in the coming years”.

 

image
For the customers at Neues Schwarz, a low-acidity Brazilian coffee roasted for espresso and brew is a consistent house favourite: “That’s the coffee we sell most. It’s less complex, but easy to brew and extract. Lots of people are asking for lower acidic coffee”. But his commitment to quality and transparency is also rewarded by some of his more curious regulars who are happy to pay a premium for different sensory experiences offered by more expensive coffees.

 

image
Benedikt feels strongly that the role of the farmer is often absent from the conversation about transparency in specialty coffee and that’s why he wants to buy as directly as possible. It is this knowledge that plays a crucial part developing a relationship, he says, with his customers, adding: “The way to make the value chain more sustainable is by communicating to customers. That’s why I like doing trade through algrano – there is an indication on what’s going to the producer. I really like the idea of connecting farmers and roasters direct via the platform. Sustainability is this direct relationship from roaster to a producer – and that’s what we would like to do more of in the future”.

 

FOLLOW NEUES SCHWARZ KAFFEE AT:

 

This article was commissioned by algrano for the blog series Demystifying the Coffee Value Chain

The nomads with a mission to put specialty on the mediterranean coffee map

Jordi Mestre’s journey into specialty coffee began on a wet and windy day on the streets of London’s East End with a cup of coffee that changed his life. Lovingly brewed out of the back of a coffee cart in Whitechapel the founder of Barcelona-based coffee company, Nomad, recalls how he tasted one of the most memorable coffees he had ever had: “It was a cold, rainy, early morning. I had everything against me to enjoy this coffee and despite the conditions, the coffee was the most amazing I had ever tried”.
image
Inspired by that singular sensory moment, Jordi’s one-month stint to learn English in the capital turned into a desire to stay and join the growing specialty coffee scene. He first established his own coffee business by drawing on his background as a product designer and started to design coffee cards for different roasteries.
But like all nomads, he had itchy feet. Spurred on by the fact that London was fast becoming one of Europe’s premier specialty coffee destinations, Jordi immersed himself as much as he could by attending training courses, gaining valuable experience as a barista, and eventually starting up his own coffee cart serving coffees around London at street food markets.
His big break in coffee came when he landed a roasting position at Nude Roastery in 2010. “It was the most amazing opportunity. I spent a couple of years there, giving trainings and that’s where I learnt a lot such as sourcing green beans and sample roasting. It was one of the best jobs I have ever had,” he says.
But three years ago, Jordi answered the call to return to native Barcelona with the mission of bringing good coffee to the city. Realising that the market wasn’t quite ready yet for a roasting operation selling directly to coffee shops, he opened up Nomad’s first coffee bar – the intimate and ever-popular Coffee Lab – with the aim of demonstrating that there were other ways to prepare, brew and enjoy specialty coffee.
image
The two-times Spanish Barista champion says that the early success of the coffee bar can be put down to his customers’ desire to appreciate new sensory experiences and the value they place on quality. “We have been very lucky, we have amazing customers who want to taste and try new things,” he adds. This trend has continued and Jordi has seen a rapid growth in the market over the past couple of years as many of his fellow country men and women return with higher expectations around coffee quality.
Yet putting great coffee on the map in a mature market of coffee drinkers like Spain has not been a walk in the park for Nomad. The bitter-tasting tradition of roasting coffee ‘torrefacto’ which involves adding sugar during the roasting process still dominates Spanish coffee-drinking habits – as it has done for more than half a century.
Jordi remarks that one of the main challenges for his business and growth of the wider specialty coffee movement in the country is communication: “In Spain, we have lots to do to make the specialty coffee scene solid where people see it as a real business and career. We need to increase the base, strengthen the scene and communicate to people that it is more than just about the price. We are offering an alternative”.
For all the attention that Jordi and his small team of roasters and baristas place on their passion for sharing exciting new coffees with their customers such as the sweet and citrusy washed caturra from the La Cocina family, grown in the El Cerro region of Nicaragua and traded bought through algrano, the urge to return to origin remains strong. Earlier this year, the 31 year-old travelled to Costa Rica to visit the farms and experience coffee production and processing at first hand: “We visited a family-owned farm, Las Lajas, where they had invented a new natural post-harvest process. I also went to Rwanda to visit small holder famers and co-operatives. It’s interesting to see how exporters support the producers to increase quality and optimize the resources available”, he comments before adding that he is already planning a trip to Nicaragua early next year.
image
Now with three locations across Barcelona including a roastery and a quintessentially repurposed Land Rover so that they can serve their coffees off the beaten track, Jordi sees Nomad as part of a new generation of roasters in the city who are working hard to bring the best coffee to their customers. To keep up with growing demand, they have recently complemented their Diedrich IR12 with a refurbished Probat UG22 as volume increases. He now spends most of his time crisscrossing the city and travelling further afield to deliver his coffee to wholesale clients while running training or consultancy for his customers.
image
And as the demand for specialty coffee grows across Barcelona and Catalonia, the expanding team of coffee pioneers at Nomad are unquestionably enjoying the journey but, crucially, have a clear sense of direction: “I believe it is important that we are transparent and try to show absolutely everything we do – there is nothing to hide. We get the best beans we can, roast them the best we know, and pass absolutely all our knowledge to all our baristas, wholesale and retail customers. We are responsible for making good green coffee better. We don’t create anything, we transform it,” says Jordi as he contemplates new horizons for next year’s coffee cherry harvest and sensory adventure.
FOLLOW NOMAD COFFEE AT:
This article was commissioned by algrano for the blog series Demystifying the Coffee Value Chain

Inspiring the next generation of women coffee roasters

The team behind Swiss-based Gipfelstürmer Kaffee stumbled into coffee in the most unlikely, and punishing of circumstances. After pushing their bodies to the limit in training sessions for the triathlon, their first instinct was to recover after a long swim with a reviving coffee. It was a hard-won qualification for the Ironman competition in Hawaii in 2007 that brought them into first contact with specialty coffee. “In Kona, it was refreshing to see this new coffee culture that was different to Switzerland – it was a fun way of expressing coffee so we decided to bring this experience back home,” says co-founder Denise Morf.

 

image
Denise, along with her business partner Simone Ernst, initially started to import roasted coffee from Hawaii. They soon realised that they could offer fresher coffee at a better price to their customers following a conversation with the roaster who supplied Simone’s parents family-owned restaurant. Following a spell of slot roasting on a Probat UG 22, they decided to invest in a Diedrich IR12 and launched Gipfelstürmer Kaffee near Zurich – meaning ‘conqueror of the peak’ – and since then, have not turned back. Revered for its ‘infrared’ burners that offer a very precise degree of control over radiant heat in the drum, Denise says that the Diedrich offers consistency over the entire roasting process while ensuring full flexibility in batch sizes.

 

image
Understanding their customer taste and flavour preferences for clean, fruity coffees has been key to their success. With this in mind, they seek to accentuate the punchiness and cleanness of their coffees with a focus on roasting for filter which they cup weekly for quality control. Gipfelstürmer Kaffee is also well known at food festivals and events across the country where they serve their single origins to customers from the back of a distinctively converted Volkswagen T2 camper van.
As people become more informed about specialty coffee in Switzerland, Denise and Simone are on a mission to democratise coffee culture in the country by broadening the base of coffee drinkers who appreciate a good brew. For them, it is important to encourage people to think about coffee in a different way; an approach that means working more closely with restaurants and coffee bars.

 

image
“We want to grow the business overall but it is about raising the level of good coffee in a broader sense,” adds Denise, “our customers want to discover and experience filter coffee in the way they do with craft beer. They want to know the story behind the product and where it comes from. As the industry moves closer to origin, it is important to educate the consumer and hold both ends of the value chain together”.

 

When asked about direct trade, Denise feels that the term is often overused. Although there are many good reasons to trade directly in the specialty coffee industry, she says, it still requires the necessary pre-financing, understanding of production and post-harvesting practices, logistics, and a lot of time and dedication. In other words, direct trade should not be a unique selling point in itself, but rather the story behind it should be unique. And to reinforce the point, the question she often asks of herself as a roaster is ‘what does the producer want to emphasise through this product?’

 

The feedback from their first algrano coffee grown by smallholder farmers that form the Cocarive Cooperative in Mantiqueira de Minas, Brazil, has been positive. Roasted for espresso, the pulped natural processed yellow Catuai has balanced notes of hazelnut, milk chocolate and offers a rich body that many of their customers look for.

 

image
After more than five years’ roasting specialty coffee, Denise is also confident about the growing prominence of women in specialty coffee – especially through initiatives such as Barista Connect run by Sonja Zweidick (twice Austrian Barista Champion) of La Cabra Coffee, Aarhus. In fact, she points out that there are more women in the industry than people actually recognise; think Anette Moldvaer of Square Mile, Anne Lunell of Koppi, Joanna Alm of Drop – just to name a few leading roasteries who have women in charge of roasting and green coffee buying. “In order to attract more women into the industry, women in key positions need to show themselves more and show what they do – so they can be role models for the next generation,” adds Denise.

 

Judging by the growth of their roasting business and commitment to quality, the two-strong woman team at Gipfelstürmer Kaffee – soon to be rebranded Vertical Coffee Roasters in early 2017 – are doing a pretty good job at inspiring the next generation of women coffee roasters themselves.

 

FOLLOW GIPFELSTÜRMER KAFFEE AT:

 

This article was commissioned by algrano for the blog series Demystifying the Coffee Value Chain